How long after a car accident can you claim car insurance?


There is no specific deadline for comprehensive auto insurance claims. But there are deadlines for CTP insurance claims, which vary by state and territory.








Compulsory third party insurance (CTP) is usually included in the cost of registering your car (except in New South Wales, where it is purchased separately and is known as Green Slip insurance). CTP insurance generally provides coverage for people who have been injured or killed in a car accident. This may include drivers, passengers, pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorcycles.




When can a comprehensive car insurance claim be made?




There is generally no specific time limit for comprehensive auto insurance claims. But in general, it is recommended that you contact your insurance provider as soon as possible after an accident and file a claim.




You will need to provide your insurance provider with information about the accident, including details of the other driver(s) involved, photos and videos, any witnesses, and any filed police reports.




When can you make a CTP insurance claim?




The time limit for filing a CTP personal injury insurance claim depends on your state or territory. In general, it ranges from as little as 28 days to receive maximum rights.




To make a CTP insurance claim, you will generally need to file a claim form with the at-fault vehicle’s CTP insurer. This will be different if your state or territory has only one CTP insurer or operates under a no-fault scheme.




Here is an overview of the current time limits in each state and territory, based on the relevant CTP regulator. If you intend to file a claim, it is a good idea to check the requirements directly with your CTP regulator. You might also consider consulting an attorney.




New South Wales – 3 months




You can file a claim up to three months after the accident. If you file a claim within 28 days of the accident, you may be entitled to back pay from the date of the accident. If you apply later, some of your rights may only start from the date the claim is made.




In NSW Green Slip insurance is provided by AAMI, Allianz, GIO, NRMA, QBE and Youi. If you don’t know who provides the insurance for the at-fault driver, the State Insurance Regulatory Authority (SIRA) says they can find out for you. You can use their CTP Connect tool or call or email CTP support.




Vic – 12 months




You have 12 months to file a claim from the date of your accident, or the date an injury from the accident first becomes apparent. Some exceptions apply. For example, the Transport Accident Commission (TAC) says it can consider claims filed within three years if there are reasonable grounds for the delay.




In Victoria, CTP insurance is provided by the TAC. TAC is a no-fault insurance plan, which means you can file a claim if you are injured in a transportation accident, even if it was your fault.




Qld – 9 months




You generally have nine months after the car accident, or the date symptoms first appear if they are not immediately apparent, to file a claim. If you have an attorney handling your claim, you must file a claim within one month of your first consultation with the attorney.




In Queensland, CTP insurance is provided by Allianz, QBE, RACQ and Suncorp. It is regulated by the Automobile Accident Insurance Commission (MAIC). You can find the at-fault driver’s CTP insurer online if you have the vehicle registration number and the date of the accident.




If you cannot identify the vehicle that caused the accident, you can still make a claim. You can file your lawsuit against the Named Defendant and you have three months to do so.




SA – 6 months




You have six months from the date of the accident to file a claim, or as soon as reasonably possible if the vehicle at fault could not be identified or was not registered at the time of the accident.




In South Australia, CTP insurance is provided by AAMI, Allianz, QBE Insurance and SGIC. It is regulated by the CTP Insurance Regulator. You can find out the CTP insurer of the faulty vehicle using EzyReg.




WA – 3 years




You should file a claim as soon as possible after an accident. But generally, you can file a car accident claim within three years from the date of the accident.




In Western Australia, CTP Insurance is provided by the Western Australian Insurance Commission as part of motor accident insurance.




Tas – 12 months




You must complete an ‘Application for Benefits’ (Form B) and return it within 12 months from the date of the accident.




In Tasmania, CTP Insurance is provided by the Motor Accident Insurance Board (MAIB). Pays for a variety of treatment and support services for eligible people who have been injured, regardless of fault.




NT – 6 months




You must file a claim as soon as possible after the accident, and no later than six months after the date of the accident.




In the Northern Territory, CTP insurance is administered by the Motor Accident Compensation Commission (MACC) and administered by TIO. It is a no-fault scheme, which means that you are covered regardless of who caused the accident.




ACT – 13 weeks




You have 13 weeks from the date of the car accident to submit the completed application documents to the vehicle owner’s insurance provider who was primarily at fault in the accident. If you file late, you may not receive all benefits until the date of the accident. You will also need to provide a clear explanation as to why you were unable to apply within 13 weeks.




In the ACT, car accident injury insurance (MAI) is provided by AAMI, Apia, GIO, and NRMA. It is regulated by the AMI Commission. If another vehicle was at fault, you can look up the vehicle owner’s MAI insurer on the Access Canberra website or by calling Access Canberra. For vehicles with NSW plates, the MAI Commission says that your CTP insurer is treated as the MAI insurer for an ACT car accident and you can search for the insurer on the Service NSW website.









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